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Implications for Treatment, Prevention & Research

Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) refers to deliberate, socially unacceptable destruction of one's own body tissue performed without the intention to die.

Eating Disorders

Nearly 3% of teenagers between the ages of 13-18 — boys as well as girls — struggle with food, weight and body image issues severe enough to constitute an eating disorder.1 Such disorders (anorexia, bulimia, binge eating) seriously affect both physical and mental health, and in some instances can be life-threatening. 

You can't venture on to the Internet these days without stumbling across some sort of editorial about the Netflix show Thirteen Reasons Why. The Chicago Tribune has called the show "highly problematic" and "dangerously wrong" (VanNoord, 2017). Vanity Fair has referred to Thirteen Reasons Why as "unsettling visual genius" (Robinson, 2017).

“You’re going to remember your first sexual experience for the rest of your life,” a wise mother said to her teenage daughter, “so think carefully before you make a decision that can end up haunting you forever.”

Helping Adolescents Thrive

Adolescence is often viewed negatively — as a difficult time of transition that exposes youth to a range of risk factors. Indeed, research has demonstrated that children are at increased risk for drug and alcohol use, sexual risk behavior, and physical fights as they transition into adolescence (Brooks, Harris, Thrall, Woods, et al. 2002).

When Siblings Struggle

"Who said you could wear my sweater?"

With our increasingly "plugged in" lifestyles, the ubiquitous availability of entertainment, and the trend to over-schedule the kids, something's gotta give. Too often, it's sleep — our own and our childrens'.