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In this engaging explanation of The New Self-Esteem, Aaron Cooper discusses the issues associated with today's abundance of parenting styles, and a potential solution for the anxieties of concerned parents and their affected children, alike. 

When Sports Aren't Fun

Whether it's soccer, baseball, gymnastics or any of the sports our children participate in, we want them to enjoy athletics. We want them to have a good time pursuing the activity they love.

Pro-Social Children

It ought to be easier to raise pro-social children — kids who are helpful and kind and empathic — since the impulse toward pro-social behavior is something we’re born with. Yet so many youngsters seem to miss the mark. Two aspects of how we raise our children may be getting in the way.

Learn Ways to Help Your Children Transition to Adulthood

In this issue of Clinical Science Insights, Jacob Goldsmith, Ph.D., explores Jeffrey Arnett’s theory of emerging adulthood, highlights potential problems that emerging adults and their families may encounter, and suggests some general guidelines for what parents can do to help and lay the foundation for a healthy parent-adult-child relationship.

The transition to college is a balancing act for students and their families. Too little engagement can leave a student feeling lost or disconnected, and can leave parents feeling like they’re in the dark. Too much engagement (e.g., so called helicopter parenting) can actually interfere with students’ growth and development.

Dim That Light

Settling youngsters down to sleep at night isn't always easy. Recent research suggests that the amount of exposure children have to bright light in the hour leading up to bedtime — whether emanating from light bulbs or electronic devices — can have a big impact on sleep-related behavior.

Northwestern Alumni Career Webinars

During the past 40 years, dual-income households have nearly doubled, and female breadwinning households are on the rise. In this discussion, we will cover the unique challenges dual-income couples face from the "second-shift" to the current child-centered parenting culture that place a strain on relationships.

Eating Disorders

Nearly 3% of teenagers between the ages of 13-18 — boys as well as girls — struggle with food, weight and body image issues severe enough to constitute an eating disorder.1 Such disorders (anorexia, bulimia, binge eating) seriously affect both physical and mental health, and in some instances can be life-threatening. 

Don't React — Respond

"Do you have the patience to wait till your mud settles and the water is clear?"
Lao Tzu
How many times a day do your children say or do something that bothers you — words or actions you know are wrong or simply irritating? And how often do you quickly correct or scold?

Hijacking Their Minds

There is increasing evidence that using smartphones, even just having them nearby, makes it harder to concentrate.